The Ethical Skeptic

Challenging Agency of Pseudo-Skepticism & Cultivated Ignorance

NFL Bias Against the Oakland/Las Vegas Raiders

A mafia need not cheat in every facet of its conduct, as this is not necessary to influence a dynamic market or community. In order to effect an anti-competitive outcome an oppressive agency may only need exploit specific indigo point factors in certain influential yet surreptitious ways. Moreover, a mafia will punctuate such methods with instances of its willingness to enact cruelty to a very visible extreme, in pursuit of quiescence and silence.

Note: because of the keen interest by vociferous Las Vegas Raider fans, as well as the NFL’s very visible and cruel hit-job on Raider’s head coach Jon Gruden in October 2021, I have extracted this section from a 2019 article on Inflection Point Theory, and made it into its own blog post.

Also please note that I condemn the racist, misogynistic, and LGBT-intolerant statements made by Jon Gruden, which were contained inside old emails of his released last week by the NFL. However I condemn as well, the NFL’s choice to release these emails on the 10th anniversary of Al Davis’s death, a full 5 months or more after they already held them – using them to effect as much personal damage, cruelty, and social polarization as was possible. Such actions only serve to make people distrustful of social justice movements and thereby further entrench net systemic biases, fears, and the overall level of class polarization.

The Mafia Cheat – Exemplified by NFL’s Exploitation of Interpretive Penalty Call/No-Call Inflection Points

Our final example of The Cheat involves a circumstance which exhibits how The Cheat itself can be hidden inside the fabric of propriety, leveraging from the subjective nature of shades-of-color interpretations and hard-to-distinguish absences which are very cleverly apportioned to effect a desired outcome.1

Cheating is the spice which makes the chef d’oeuvre. Cheat through bias of omission not commission, only marginally enough to enact the goal and then no further, and while bearing a stately manner in all other things. Intimidate or coerce participants to remain silent.

Indigo point raison d’être: Interpretive Penalty Calls/No-Calls at Critical Indigo Points and Rates which Benefit Perennially Favored Teams and Disadvantage Others

I watched a National Football League (NFL) game last week (statistics herein have been updated for NFL end-of-season 2019) where the entire outcome of the game was determined by three specific and flawed penalty calls on the part of the game referees. The calls in review, were all invalid flag tosses of an interpretive nature, which reversed twice, one team’s (Detroit Lions) stopping a come-from-behind drive by the ‘winning’ team (Green Bay Packers). Twice their opponent was given a touchdown by means of invalid violations for ‘hands-to-the-face’, on the part of a defensive lineman. Penalty flag tosses which cannot be changed by countermanding and clear evidence, as was the case in this game. The flags alone artificially turned the tide of the entire game. The ‘winning’ quarterback Aaron Rodgers, a man of great talent and integrity, when interviewed afterwards humbly said “It didn’t really feel like we had won the game, until I looked up at the scoreboard at the end.” Aaron Rodgers is a forthright Tau Point Man – he does not hide his bias or agency inside noise. Such honesty serves to contrast the indigo point nature and influence of penalties inside of America’s pastime of professional football. Most of the NFL’s manner of exploitation does not present itself in such obvious Tau Point fashion, as occurred in this Lions-Packers game.

An interpretive penalty is the most high-sensitivity inflection point mechanism impacting the game of professional football. For some reason they are not as impactful in its analogue, the NCAA of college football. Not that referees are not frustrating in that league either, but they do not have the world-crushing and stultifying impact as do the officials inside of the NFL. NFL officials single-handedly and often determine the outcome of games, division competitions and Super Bowl appearances. They achieve this (whether intended or not) impact by means of a critically placed set of calls, and more importantly no-calls, with regard to these interpretive subjective penalties. Patterns which can be observed as consistent across decades of the NFL’s agency-infused and court-defined ‘entertainment’. Let’s examine these call (Indigo Point Commissions) and no-call (Indigo Point Omissions) patterns by means of two specific and recent team examples respectively – the cases of the 2019 Oakland Raiders and the 2017 New England Patriots (note: only the Oakland Raider analysis is presented in this extract from the original article).

Indigo-Commission Disadvantages Specific NFL Teams: Case of the Oakland Raiders

Argument #1 – The Penalty Detriment-Benefit Spread and Raider 60-Year Penalty History

The NFL Oakland Raiders have consistently been the ‘most penalized’ team by far, over the last 60 years of NFL operations. Year after year they are flagged more than any other team. For a while, this was an amusing shtick concerning the bad-guy aura the Raiders carried 40 or 50 years ago. But when one examines the statistics, and the types of penalties involved – consistent through six decades, multiple dozens of various level coaches who were not as highly penalized elsewhere in their careers, two owners and 10 varieties of front offices – the idea that this team gets penalized, ‘because they are supposed to’ begins to fall flat under the evidence. Of course it is also no surprise that the Raiders hold the record for the most penalties in a single game as well, 23 penalties and 200 yards penalized.2

However, it is not whether or not your team is the most penalized in any given year; rather, it is the spread between how often a team is penalized, as compared to how often their opponents are penalized. A typical year for the Raiders can be observed in the chart above, which I created through analyzing the penalty databases at NFLPenalties.com.3 The detailed data analysis can be viewed by clicking here. True to form, the Oakland Raiders were penalized per play once again for 2019 (see the previous years here), more than any other NFL team (save for Jacksonville who narrowly overtook the Raiders with a late-season 16-penalty game). More to the point however, for the 2019 NFL Season the greatest differential between penalties-against and penalties-benefit, once again is held by the Oakland Raiders. What the chart shows is that in general, it takes 9 less plays executed for the Raiders (1 penalty every 21 plays) to be awarded their next penalty flag, as compared to their opponent (one penalty every 30 plays). Or put another way, the Raiders were flagged an average of 8 times per game, while comparatively their opponents were flagged on average 5.6 times per game – inside a range of feasibility which annually runs from about 8.2 to 5.4 to begin with.  These Oakland Raider 2019 penalty results are hugging the highest and lowest possible extremes for team versus opponent penalties respectively.

For 2019 the Oakland Raiders were again one of the most penalized team per game play in the NFL –
while one of the least penalized teams per play in the NFL was
whatever team happened to be playing the Oakland Raiders each week.

A popular older version of the graphic, which outlined this condition through game 10 of the season can be viewed here: Most to Least Penalized – 2019 Oakland Raiders and Their Opponents.4 Nevertheless the bottom line is this, and it is unassailable:

The Oakland Raiders are far and above more penalized than any other NFL team, leading the league as the most penalized team in season-years 1963, 1968-69, 1982, 1984, 1991, 1993-96, 2003-05, 2009-11, 2016, and most of 2019 – further then landing in the top 3 penalized teams every year from 1982 through to 2019 with only a few exceptions.5 6

Argument #2 – The Drive-Sustaining Penalty Deficit

In the case of the Raiders, the overcall/undercall of penalties is not a matter of coaching discipline, as one might reasonably presume at first blush – rather, in many of the years in question the vast majority of the penalty incident imbalances involve calls of merely subtle interpretation (marked in yellow in the chart below). Things which can be called on every single play, but for various reasons, are not called for certain teams, and are more heavily called on a few targeted teams – flags thrown or not thrown at critical moments in a drive, or upon a beneficial turnover or touchdown. To wit, in the chart which I developed to the right, one can discern that not only are the Oakland Raiders the most differentially-penalized team in the NFL for the 2019 season once again – but as well, the penalties which are thrown against the Raiders are done so at the most critically-disfavoring moments in their games. Times when the Raiders have forced the opposing team into 3rd down and long circumstances and their opponent therefore needed a break and an automatic first down in order to sustain a scoring drive. As you may observe in the chart, a team playing the Raiders in such a circumstance for 2019, bore by far the greatest likelihood of being awarded the subjective-call7 critical break they needed from NFL officials.8 The curve which is created by the flow of these blue bars is a very familiar curve inside systems theory. It is called a ‘Human-S’ curve, and relates to any system measure which is an outcome of solely human performance. What is key to me as a systems professional is that 31 of 32 teams in this chart fall nicely on an expected Human-S ranking distribution. Only one team does not.9

The net uptake of this is that across their 16-game 2019 season the Raiders had 37 more drives impacted negatively by penalties versus the average NFL team on their schedule – equating to a whopping 96 additional opponent score points (by the Net Drive Points chart below). Above and beyond their opponents’ performances along this same index, this equates to at least an additional 6 points per game (because of unknown ball control minutes impact) being awarded to Raider 2019 opponents. Thereby making the difference between a 7 – 9 versus a 9 – 7 (or possibly even 10 – 6) record – not to mention the loss of a playoff berth. One can view the calculation tables for this set of data here. So yes, this disadvantage versus the NFL teams on the Raider’s 2019 schedule was a big deal in terms of their overall season success.

Calls for objective violations, such as delay of game, too many players, neutral zone infractions, encroachment and false starts – things which are not subject to interpretation – analyze these penalties and you will find that the Raiders actually perform better in these penalty categories than the NFL average (see chart on right for 2019 called penalties). These are the ‘discipline indicator’ class of penalties. What the astute investigator will find is that, contrary to the story-line foisted for decades concerning this reputation on the part of the Raiders, the team actually fares rather well in these measures. In contrast however, one can glean from the Net Drive Points chart below and derive the same number in the chart to the right, that the Raiders are penalized at double (2x) the rate of the average NFL team for scoring-drive subjective-call defensive penalties, and as well 16.3% higher for all interpretive penalty types in total (yellow Raider totals in the Net Drive Points chart below). In contrast, the Raiders are penalized at 72% of the League average for objective class or non-interpretive penalties. It is just a simple fact that the Raiders are examined by League officials with twice as much scrutiny for the violations of defensive holding, unnecessary roughness, offensive and defensive pass interference, roughing the passer, illegal pick, illegal contact and player disqualification. One can observe the analysis supporting this for 2019 Called Penalties here.10

The non-interpretive penalties (or ‘Discipline Class’ in the chart to the right) cannot be employed as inflection points of control, so their statistics will of course trend towards a more reasonable mean. Accordingly, this falsifies the notion that the Raiders are more penalized than other NFL teams because of shortfalls in coaching disciplines. If this were the case, there should be no differential between the objective versus interpretive penalty-type stats. In fact, inside this ‘discipline indicator’ penalty class, the Raiders fare better than the average NFL team. But this broaches the question, do the coaching penalty statistics then corroborate this intelligence? Yes, as it happens, they do.

Argument #3 – Oakland Raider Head Coach Penalty Burden

Further then falsifying this notion that excess Raider penalties are a result of coaching and discipline, are the NFL penalty statistics of the Raider head coaches themselves. Such a notion does not pan out under that evidence either. On average Raider head coaches have been penalized 31.6% higher in their years as a Raider head coach than in their years as head coach of another NFL team. However, for conservancy we have chosen in the graph to the right to weight average coach’s contribution by the number of years coached in each role. Thus, conservatively a Raider head coach is penalized 26.3% more in that role as compared to their head coaching stints both before and after their tenure as head coach of the Oakland Raiders.11 Accordingly, this significant disadvantage has been part of the impetus which has shortened many coach tenures with the Raiders, thereby helping account for the 3.3 year Raider average tenure, versus the 6.6 year average tenure on the part of the same group of coaches both before and after being head coach of the Raiders. One can observe this in the graph, which reflects a blend of eight NFL coaches over the 1979 – 2019 NFL seasons; all prominent NFL coaches who spent significant time – 16 years on average coaching both the Raiders as well as other NFL teams.12

Not even one of the nineteen head coaches in the entire history of the Raider organization bucked this trend of being higher penalized as a Raider head coach. Not even one. Let that sink in.

There is no reasonable possibility, that all these coaches and their variety of organizations could be that undisciplined, almost every single season for 50 years. The data analysis supporting this graphic can be viewed here.

Argument #4 – Oakland Raider Player Penalty Burden

Statistically this coaching differential has to impute to the players’ performances as well, through the association of common-base data. Former Raider cornerback D.J. Hayden portrayed this well in his recent contention that he was penalized more as an Oakland Raider than with other teams. In fact if we examine the Pro Football Reference data, indeed Hayden was penalized a total of 35 times during his four years as a Raider defensive back, and only 11 times in his three years with Detroit and Jacksonville. This equates to 35 penalties in 45 games played for the Raiders, compared to only 11 penalties in 41 games played for other teams.13 That reflects a 65% reduction in penalty per game played and 55% reduction in penalty per snap played during his tenure with a team other than the Oakland Raiders.14

Such detriment constitutes a disincentive for players to want to play for a team which is penalized so often – potentially marring their careers and negatively impacting their dreams for Pro Bowl, MVP or even Hall of Fame selections. This is part of the reason I believe, as to why the badge-of-honor tag-phrase has evolved “Once a Raider, Always a Raider”. In order to play for the Raiders, you pretty much have to acknowledge this shtick inside your career, and live with it for life. Should we now asterisk every player and coach in the NFL Hall of Fame with a ‘Played for the Oakland Raiders’ asterisk now? A kind of reverse steroid-penalty bias negatively impacting a player’s career?

In the end, all such systemic bias serves to do is erode NFL brand, cost the NFL its revenue – and most importantly, harm fans, players, coaches and families.

NFL, your brand and reputation has drifted since the infamous Tuck Rule Game, into becoming ‘Bill Belichick and the Zebra Street Boys’. Your’s is a brand containing the word ‘National’, and as a league you should act accordingly to protect it. Nurture and protect it through a strategy of optimizing product quality.

And finally, the most idiotic thing one can do is to blame all this on the Oakland fans, as was done in this boneheaded article by the Bleacher Report on the Raider penalty problem from as far back as February 2012.

Collectively, all this is known inside any other professional context as ‘bias’ or could even be construed by angry fans as cheating – and when members of an organization are forced under financial/career penalty to remain silent about such activity (extortion, such as in the case of Jon Gruden’s past objections to NFL officiating), when you observe coaches and players and more importantly members of the free press as well, biting their tongue over this issue – this starts to become reminiscent of prohibition era 18 U.S.C. § 1961 – U.S. Code Racketeering activity.

When you examine the history of such data, much of this patterning in bias remains consistent, decade after decade. It is systemic. It is agency. One can find and download into a datamart or spreadsheet for their own derivation, the history of NFL penalties by game, type, team, etc. here: NFL Penalty Tracker. Go and look for yourself, and you will see that what I am saying is true.

This condition has gone on for five decades (ostensibly since, but in reality much further back than the notorious ‘Tuck Rule’ AFC Championship Game, the video of which can no longer be found in its original form because the NFL edited out over 2 minutes in order to conceal the game’s penalty no-call Tau Point league phone call intervention). The penalties which are called or not-called are of an interpretive nature – again those that occur most every single down, but are called on some teams consistently, and on other teams not so much.

A Profile in Modern Mafia-Like Activity

It took me a while in order to come to this realization that the NFL is indeed a modern form of mafia. Because of

  • the presence of closed-door threats and fines to its members in order to silence them,15
  • preplanned hit-jobs on disfavored members (such as the case of NFL-officiating critic Jon Gruden in 2021),
  • constraint of trade in player contracts/draft picks,16
  • harm to coaches’ and players’ careers,17
  • monopolistic overcharging for services,18
  • constraint of trade (trust) activity,19
  • contract fraud with customers (see below),20
  • the NFL’s admission in a court of law that NFL games may at times indeed be fixed (Mayer v. Belichick/NFL, 2010),21
  • the revenue gained through under-the-table and malicious manipulation of the success of specific football teams/games/seasons,22 and
  • the incumbent manipulated flow (from all of the above) of grey market money (gambling fraud),

the National Football League is actually not a cartel, rather they are therefore more akin to a modern mafia by definition.23 24

In fact, the NFL had to be forced by the US Supreme Court in a 2010 case, to admit its hidden contract terms outlining that fans are not purchasing viewing rights to a ‘fair’ event in the first place.25 The NFL tacitly admitted in this legal case that any particular game might indeed be fixed (no stipulation as to ‘by whom’).

The NFL argued in Mayer v. Belichick, 2010 in essence, that since it cannot guarantee that players, coaches, or officials will not cheat, therefore it cannot guarantee the paying spectator a ‘fair’ game – but rather merely, ‘entertainment’. Therefore, under this legal permissive, the NFL regards itself as bearing defacto license to also cheat as it may see fit.26

However, it is contract fraud to bill customers27 who are being misled that they are watching or wagering upon unbiased games of skill, chance and coaching in purchase of a product which is touted to be one thing, but is delivered as a form of charade. I personally paid $29,000 to NFL Sunday Ticket and DirectTV over the last two decades of viewing NFL games, being misled by the false NFL claim that I was enjoining sporting league events wherein my preferred (or wagered) team, the Raiders, had a chance of success through skill, draft selection, talent, coaching, and ball bounces. I was not disclosed the NFL organization’s conspiracy to disadvantage the Raiders, when I entered into this agreement.

The targeting of the Raider franchise is a materially different legal litmus than the NFL’s simply not being able to guarantee a ‘fair’ game. The instance wherein an organization maliciously and consistently disfavors a single team (business) over decades (to the harm of many financially at-risk entities), remains contract fraud, conspiracy in restraint of trade (trust activty), and racketeering – separate legal torts from the NFL’s ‘fair game’ argument disclosed in Mayer v. Belichick. Someone will eventually press this legal distinction and will win their case.

Finally, regardless of the NFL’s ‘fair game’ exclusion, if a Party withholds the terms of a contract they solicited to another Party, only later revealing those terms in the context of a ‘counter-argument’ in a legal proceeding regarding that contract, then a fortiori the contract was fraudulent in the inception. Those terms had to be disclosed prior to the agreement taking place. Disclosing those terms in a 2010 Supreme Court case, is far too after-the-fact to avoid contract fraud collective action brought by millions of financially harmed Raider spectators like myself.

If the NFL had subtexted in its ads promoting its network games or NFL Sunday Ticket,
“The NFL reserves the right to influence individual game outcomes and moreover favor or disfavor
various teams at its sole discretion.” well then they would have an argument.

The NFL failed to inform me however, that my preferred team would be surreptitiously and maliciously
disfavored, to the point where they bore no chance of success at all.

This is a pivotal reason why I dumped NFL Sunday Ticket and DirectTV. I am not into being bilked of hard-earned household money by a mafia.

Update (Dec 2019): NFL is reportedly planning a “top-down review” of the league’s officiating during the 2020 offseason.

Such shenanigans represent the everpresence and impact of agency (not merely bias). Bias can be mitigated; however, agency involves the removal and/or disruption of the power structures of the cartel, cabal and mafia. This case example in corruption regarding the NFL demonstrates how agency can manipulate inflection dynamics to reach a desired tipping point – after which one can sit in their university or league office and enjoy tenure, all the way to sure victory. The only tasks which remain are to protect the indigo point secret formula by means of an appropriate catch phrase, and as well ensure that one does not have any mirrors hanging about, so that you do not have to look at yourself.

An ethical skeptic maintains a different view as to how people should be treated, and championships, ethical markets, as well as scientific understanding, should be prosecuted and won.

The Ethical Skeptic, “NFL Bias Against the Oakland/Las Vegas Raiders”; The Ethical Skeptic, WordPress, 20 Oct 2019; Web, https://theethicalskeptic.com/?p=53350

October 18, 2021 Posted by | Ethical Skepticism | , , , | 1 Comment

Eternal are the Embers which Conflagrate the Library of History

There are two forms of destruction, simple obliteration, or the more tantalizing prospect of surreptitiously capturing into one’s collection, an asset which is thereafter regarded by history as having been obliterated. Especially if that asset is Nelsonian knowledge pertaining to mankind’s history. For of what value is knowledge, if every man possesses it? Such knowledge is more precious, powerful, and perishable than mere gold.

The great Library of Alexandria was part of a larger research institute called the Mouseion at Alexandria. It was established upon the Ptolemaic Royal Palace grounds in the Egyptian capitol city of Alexandria in 283 bce during the time of Ptolemy Soter I. The Library itself was purported to house anywhere from 40,000 to 400,000 books, codices, and scrolls – most derived from the documentary antiquity of Greece, the Levant, Egypt, Persia, and India. Given that these regions comprise the birthplace of modern humanity, it can be speculated therefore that this trove of documents included significant works outlining the emergence and ascendancy of modern civilization, and possibly much of its prehistory as well.

Throughout various touchpoints in history the Library underwent a steady process of decline and destruction; its curators even being forced into exile by various fanatic influences over the centuries. The Library was of course eventually destroyed, with its works either having been burned or disseminated into other hands over time. 1

There exist four primary notions as to how the destruction/demise of the Library of Alexandria came about.2 3 4

  1. Accidental burning, 48 bce – from soldiers setting fire to Egyptian ships in Alexandria’s harbor during Caesar’s Civil War.
  2. Military conquest and razing, 260 – 275 ad – by Palmyrene invasion and/or subsequent recapture of Alexandria by Roman Emperor Aurelian.
  3. Christian razing, 391 and/or 415 ad – in retaliation against both Jews and Pagans, one of which was Library Member Hypatia.
  4. Islamic retaking and burning of Alexandria, 646 ad – as Amr ibn al-As’ revenge against the capture of Alexandria by Byzantine Emperor Constans II.

While it is easy narrative to solely blame various religions for the obliteration of mankind’s history, it is very likely that all four of the influences above played some part in the Library’s full demise. However, given that the Library was located on the Ptolemaic Royal Palace grounds, and contained such a vast trove of leather-bound scrolls, metal codices, and books (as a Top Secret materials custodian who has burned documents regularly as part of his duties, this would have taken an army months to actually destroy by burning. Burning is not such an easy solution as it might appear), one could imagine that significant impacts to the Library would necessarily have involved military conquest, control of the area for months or even years, along with confiscation of many documents into competing royal libraries and private collections. If indeed the documents were stolen, of course the simpler explanation of ‘they all got burned up’ would be preferable and simpleton history.

The most clever of deception is that which exploits the luxurious wisdom of the simplest explanation.

Even the most cynical of fundamentalist emperor or general would succumb to the heady nature of holding lock-and-key knowledge which no other king or civilization possessed – especially if such knowledge pertained to the cryptic emergence of mankind (see The Dual-Burden Model of Inferential Ethics – “An Example Inside Evolutionary Genetics”). Moreover, no mere riot nor civil disturbance could accomplish this level of destruction, as there simply would not have been sufficient time to destroy nor sort through most documents. No, these documents were not burned subject to the mythical sentiment of Muslim Caliph Omar, who was purported to have uttered, “They [Library documents] will either contradict the Quran, in which case they are heresy, or they will agree with it, so they are superfluous. Destroy them all.”5 I don’t buy this as history for one minute.

Exploit stakes seldom go uncaptured.

These documents were too valuable as knowledge. Knowledge is indeed power, and as such many of these documents were more precious and perishable than mere gold. In the context of a military conquest, it is more likely that an exiled curator was taken into confidence, and the Library subsequently became target of well-orchestrated pilfering – as opposed to destruction at the hand of foaming-at-the-mouth Neanderthals or hood-clad book burners. Such fairy tale imagery may serve to satisfy the shallow cravings of budding academics and atheists, but not the curious wisdom of an ethical skeptic. Isn’t it funny how simple explanatory tales always conveniently identify enemies of the Cabal as the perpetrator?

Nonetheless the real story, as is almost always the case, is not nearly as simple as we desire it to be. Many of these former Library of Alexandria documents, I conjecture, still exist in private collections and in powerful hands. The purging from history of collections such as

  • The Dead Sea Scrolls (408 – 318 bce, buried in clay jars, Qumran West Bank, disc. 1946),6
  • The Nag Hammadi Library (300 bce – 370 ad, buried in clay jars, central Egypt, disc. 1945),7 and
  • Sumerian historical and religious cylinder seals (4500 – 2100 bce, buried by conquest ???, disc. 1950’s-)8

stand as exemplary testament to the age-old handiwork of this Cabal, and their active extinguishing of anything which might broach their coveted Nelsonian knowledge. However, these collections appear to be derived from an extensive documentation of human history which has now become extinct. This absence of the library of man’s ascendancy is purposeful, not accidental.

The agencies (not simply our religious institutions) which obfuscate and control our access to information today, work analogously to the conquering armies of the past. They are meticulous in their theft and burial of that which is the property of all of mankind. They are ruthless in their obliteration of institutions and individuals which might seek or develop such knowledge outside their approval.9 They are insistent that you venerate only that which they consider to be authoritative Canon and truth. They might even hire the dilettante to abuse skepticism inside this malicious errand.10 You dear reader, as their subject, were never intended to have access to this knowledge to begin with. For of what interest is suffering unless it be made savory from the pleasant broth of ignorance? The despair of innocently not even knowing why. Who is drunk on such libation, is indeed our Enemy from the beginning.

When human intervention is the critical feature of a hypothesis, human intervention to a priori obfuscate that hypothesis, forces it into becoming the null.

An idea cannot be a conspiracy theory, if it is also the null hypothesis.

The squelching of mankind’s critical path knowledge is never benevolent. This form of pathology is not mere bias, but rather agency. Agency and influence which has persisted much longer than the vagaries of mere nation and empire.

The Ethical Skeptic, “Eternal are the Embers which Conflagrate the Library of History”; The Ethical Skeptic, WordPress, 16 Oct 2021; Web, https://theethicalskeptic.com/?p=53225

October 16, 2021 Posted by | Agenda Propaganda, Ethical Skepticism | , | 2 Comments

The Human Haunted World – An Equality in Paucity

I contend once again, Carl Sagan was neither correct, nor really all that brilliant. In his oft-lauded ‘The Demon-Haunted World’ quip, he miscalled entirely the constituency who would end up becoming our problem. I fixed it.

I bear an apprehension about an America in my, my children’s, and grandchildren’s time – when oligarch and technology powers rule and are in the hands of a few elite cronies, and no one representing the public interest is permitted to speak against, much less stop what is occurring; when the people have lost the ability to control their own destinies and are forbidden access to the resources and rights to question those in authority; when, clutching our progressive buzzwords and nervously surveying our science communicators’ latest witch-hunt, our critical faculties seared, unable to distinguish between virtuous-sounding agitprop and what’s actually ethical or scientific, we slide, almost without noticing, straight into civil strife, an equality in paucity, and oppression.

The Ethical Skeptic, “The Human Haunted World – An Equality in Paucity”; The Ethical Skeptic, WordPress, 13 Oct 2021; Web, https://theethicalskeptic.com/2021/10/13/the-human-haunted-world-an-equality-in-paucity/

October 13, 2021 Posted by | Ethical Skepticism | , | 1 Comment

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